Friends International English Conversation Group

We have talked about birthdays and non-divisible verbs.

Ich habe Geburtstag – I have a birthday

Ich mache eine Geburtstagsfeier – I have a birthday party

Ich lade viele Leute ein – I will invite many people

Geburtstagskind – birthday child

Alle Geschenke sind auf meinem Geburtstagstisch – all presents are on my birthday table

Ich habe viele Geburtstagsgrüße bekommen – I have got many birthday wishes

Meine Frau hat mir einen Geburtstagskuchen gebacken – my wife has baked a birthday cake

Herzlichen Glückwunsch zum Geburtstag – many happy returns

Viel gesundheit und ein langes Leben – the best of health and a long life

Other phrases:

Das schaffe ich / das geht – I can manage that

Das klappt/Das bekomme ich hin, das bekomme ich gebacken (informal)

to kod someone – jemanden veralbern/veräppeln (colloquial)/verarschen (rude)

schubsen – to push until sth/sb falls

=> Die Kinder schubsen sich / Schubs mich nicht um!

in contrast to: schieben – push

=> Sein Fahrrad ist kaputt, er muss es schieben

Push = drücken => die Tür, einen Knopf

Indivisible compound verbs:

überreichen: Ich freue mich, Ihnen die Urkunde zu überreichen (Nicht: über zu reichen!)

Wiederholen: Ich rate euch, die Vokabeln zu wiederholen

Überholen: Das Auto hat mich gerade überholt (nicht: übergeholt!)

In contrast to:

überziehen (Kleidung anziehen): Er hat sich gerade einen Pullover übergezogen / Zieh dir einen Pullover über!

Rule: If a compound verb has an own meaning and the preposition does not indicate a direction, is not meaningful itself, if dividing the verb into two words does not make sense, it stays together.

=> There is no meanig to über zu reichen, but there is one in weg zu gehen (going away).

See you soon with more German phrases!

During the last meetings, we talked about flats/apartments.

die Wohnung – flat/apartment

die Dach(geschoss)wohnung – the penthouse

der Hof – the courtyard in the middle of a block of flats

das Stockwerk – the floor / storey

das Erdgeschoss – ground floor

der Souterrain – basement

das Treppenhaus – stairs / stairway

der Aufzug/Fahrstuhl – lift/elevator

der Flur – the corridor

der Dachgarten – roof garden

der Balkon – balcony

eine Wohnung mieten – rent

eine Wohnung vermieten – let an apartment

der Mieter – tenant

der Vermieter – landlord

die Miete zahlen – pay the rent

renovieren – renovate, redecorate

die Baugesellschaft – building society

die Baugenossenschaft – cooperative building society

der Eigentümer – owner

der Fußboden – floor

die Fliese/-n – tiles

das Parkett – parquett

der Holzfußboden – wooden floor

der Gas-/Stromzähler – gas / electricity meter

read the meter – den Zähler ablesen

die Schiebetür – sliding door

schieben / drücken – push

ziehen – pull

ein Fahrrad schieben – push a bike

die Zentralheizung – central heating

der Heizkörper – radiator

die Fernheizung – district heating

die Kaution – deposit

der Stuck (an der Decke) – stucco, plastering

der Mietvertrag – rental contract

einen Vertrag schließen – sign a contract

kündigen – cancel

in eine Wohnung einziehen – move into an apartment

umziehen – remove

umziehen: Kleidung – change clothes

ausziehen – move out

ausziehen: Kleidung – take off clothes

Keep on learning!

Snowflakes say hi in Berlin; “Let´s create a bit of chaos at the S-Bahn!” “For the reason of broken-down trains and switches out of order, there will be disruptions in train service. We apologize for any inconvenience and ask for your consideration.”

At our last meeting, we talked about the weather and some more words that came up during the meeting.

Das Wetter

Es ist kalt/eisig/warm/heiß – it is cold/freezing/warm/hot

Mir ist kalt/... – I am cold/…

Es ist heiter/wolkig/bedeckt/sonnig– it is bright/cloudy/overcast/sunny

Es ist sehr/zu kalt… – it is very/too cold…

Frühling/Sommer/Herbst/Winter – spring/summer/autumn/winter

Der Wind – wind

windig – windy

Der Sturm – storm

stürmisch – stormy

Der Hagel – hail

Der Schneeregen – sleet

Der Nieselregen – drizzle

Die Eisglätte – there is no such word in English; LEO dictionary gives the phrase “icy conditions”, but that does not seem very satisfactory to me…

Questions that arose during the meeting

Die Nervensäge – nag in German as a verb “nörgeln, meckern”

gewohnt: Früher habe ich in Berlin gewohnt – perfect form of wohnen – live

gewöhnt: Ich bin gewöhnt, früh aufzustehen – be used to

Rasen, Wiese, Weide, Feld, Heide

= lawn, meadow, field, heath

bright in German: not only beautiful weather!

  leuchtend
  strahlend
  aufgeweckt
  blank
  fröhlich
  froh
  gescheit
  glänzend
  heiter
  intelligent
  klar
  klug
  licht
  sehr freundlich

See you next Monday, to practise and discuss more German phrases!

Dear Friends of the German language,

in our first two meetings of conversational German, we learned the following phrases:

Greeting somebody and saying good bye:

Guten Morgen – in the morning

Guten Tag – during the day

Guten Abend – in the evening

Gute Nacht – only for saying good bye at night

Auf Wiedersehen – good bye

Tschüß – colloquial saying good bye

Mahlzeit (= “Gesegnete Mahlzeit”) – at noontime for lunch

Asking a direction:

Fährt dieser Bus zum Zoo? – Does this bus go to the zoo?

Wohin fährt dieser Bus? – Wher does this bus go?

Being late (e.g. for an appointment, a meeting):

Es tut mir leid, dass ich zu spät bin – Sorry for being late

Die S-Bahn war verspätet – the S-Bahn was delayed

Ich habe verschlafen – I overslept

At the station:

Der Bahnsteig – the platform

Das Gleis – the track

Der Zug fährt von Bahnsteig / Gleis 1 – the train leaves from platform 1

Zug in Richtung Leipzig – train for Leipzig

Der Zug ist schon weg – the train has already left

Der Zug kommt noch – the train will arrive

Der Zug ist noch nicht weg – the train has not yet left

=> schon – already

=> noch – still

=> noch nicht – not yet

Eating

essen – for humans

futtern – eat fast and much (colloquial)

fressen – for animals or insulting for humans

füttern – feed

Ich esse gerade Mittag – I am just having lunch

Er futtert ganz schön viel – he eats quite a lot

Die Katze frisst eine Maus – the cat is eating a mouse

Addressing people:

Addressing someone by “du” is informal and only for friends or someone you know well. In some professions, colleages address each other by “du”, like IKEA or the media branch. It is the same as being on first name terms in English.

If you are on the job or you don´t know someone well or not at all, you better use “Sie”, especially if the person is much older than you or in a higher position and you want or have to express esteem. It is the same as being on second name terms in English.

Keep learning and practising German, especially if you live in Germany. Conditions are favourable if you live in a native language environment.

Friends help friends with learning German! Additionally to our regular meetings on Tuesdays, we are introducing a meeting on Mondays at a Berlin location to learn phrases and words to be able to communicate in German instantly and use it in German context. We are starting with the topics introducing oneself, buying something, asking the way and using numbers.

This is no commercial language course and absolutely free. It is there for friends getting assistance from friends. If you are interested in participating, contact berlinfriendsclub@arcor.de.

During our last Friends Club meeting, somebody brought this up:

Everybody knows the feeling that after a good round of walking, running or playing football or tennis, there is a funny feeling in your muscles which makes it nearly unable to move.

In German, the word is “Muskelkater”. But there is no use translating it literally, as for “Muskel” the English word is “muscle”, but the German word “Kater” means “tom cat” in English, That does not make any sense. Still, there is another meaning for “Kater” in English: “hangover”! And this gets us nearer to the meaning of “Muskelkater”, as you use “Kater” in German for any state of physical indisposition coming from a reason such as too much alcohol or physical exercise.

So, for the German word “Muskelkater” you would use “sore muscles” or “aching muscles”, as the LEO dictionary tells us. The Google translater only knows “ache”, which is fairly unspecific.

For more of these discussions, why don´t you join us at Berlin Friends Club? You will get a warm welcome and you can sure to spend some joyful, interesting hours each Tuesday.

See you then!

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January 2020
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