Friends International English Conversation Group

Posts Tagged ‘meeting

During our last meeting we talked about favourite meals and came across the asparagus. It is a seasonal vegetable only harvested in spring. In Germany it is a very popular dish, and grown in nearly all parts of the country, such as Brandenburg, North Rhine Westphalia, Lower Saxony and Rhineland Palatine. It is also grown in North and South Americas, Greece, Poland etc, but it is rarely consumed there. I have no notice of any British who prefer it, and a Polish Friend has told me at our meeting that it is grown there but mostly exported to Germany. Its healthy effects on the human body are undisputed.

Asparagus can be consumed either on its own or together with potatoes and/or a porc chop. Bacon goes very nicely with it, especially the bacon being wrapped around the spears. Another combination is a piece of salmon fillet going with it, so you have the taste of two extraordinary dishes in one.

Asparagus can be purchased green or with violet tips or all white and in different thicknesses. White thick evenly grown spears are the most expensive; it costs between 7 and 10 Euro per kilo, depending on its quality. For the starting soup, take the water in which you cooked the asparagus and add some salt and spices and broken asparagus (smaller pieces) to make it tasteful.

Most asparagus farms also offer an open air restaurant to consume the delicious dish right on site and stage events for their customers. So what about a day out to the South of Berlin for pure enjoyment?

This is another summary of what we have discussed during one of our meetings:

Getränke – drinks

Weizenbier/Weißbier – wheat beer

Saft – juice

Schorle – any juice or wine mixed with water

verdünnen – dilute

ablöschen – deglaze (put water or spirit on a boiling meal)

auflösen – dissolve

aufgeregt – excited => sich aufgegen – get excited

sprechen, reden – speak

eine Rede halten – jold a speech

sich unterhalten – talk to each other

wir haben uns darüber schon unterhalten – We´ve already talked about that

anstehen/sich anstellen – queue up

sich vordrängeln – jump the queue, push to the front

Hinz und Kunz – jeder

Da war Hinz und Kunz da – all sorts of people were there

Ein Ei abschrecken – chill an egg

Achtung:

Ein Ei pellen => die Pelle – eggschell

Einen Apfel/eine Kartoffel schälen => die Schale – skin

Die Haut auf der heißen Milch – the skin on hot milk

jemandem auf die Pelle rücken – (popular) to get to close to sb.

=> Rück mir nicht so auf die Pelle

Schaum – foam

Er schäumt vor Wut – he is furious with anger

There you are! Keep learning and see you again!

At our last meeting, we had members from all corners of the world: US, Britain, France, Ukraine, South Korea, South Africa, Georgia and Germany. All of us love to get information about foraign countries, their culture, their history and their current situation.

So I learned a lot about Georgia, a lot of facts I did not learn about. Georgia is situated at the Black Sea, south of Russia. It has a great history, starting long before the history of most European states. It has a language and writing of its own which is far different from any other languages and writing. In some cases, when we have to form a sentence, in Georgian language its contents can be skimmed into one word. The letters are totally different from what Latin or Kyrillic letters look like.

While the Soviet Union existed, Georgia was a part of this empire, but regained its independency after the Soviet Union fell apart. Still, Russia is trying to keep its influence, by military and economic means, e.g. by cutting off gas supplies.

If you are as keen on learning more about different nations and conversing in English as I am, why don´t you join us on Tuesdays at Thai Su restaurant in Berlin-Kreuzberg? Everybody will give you a warm welcome.

During the last meetings, we talked about flats/apartments.

die Wohnung – flat/apartment

die Dach(geschoss)wohnung – the penthouse

der Hof – the courtyard in the middle of a block of flats

das Stockwerk – the floor / storey

das Erdgeschoss – ground floor

der Souterrain – basement

das Treppenhaus – stairs / stairway

der Aufzug/Fahrstuhl – lift/elevator

der Flur – the corridor

der Dachgarten – roof garden

der Balkon – balcony

eine Wohnung mieten – rent

eine Wohnung vermieten – let an apartment

der Mieter – tenant

der Vermieter – landlord

die Miete zahlen – pay the rent

renovieren – renovate, redecorate

die Baugesellschaft – building society

die Baugenossenschaft – cooperative building society

der Eigentümer – owner

der Fußboden – floor

die Fliese/-n – tiles

das Parkett – parquett

der Holzfußboden – wooden floor

der Gas-/Stromzähler – gas / electricity meter

read the meter – den Zähler ablesen

die Schiebetür – sliding door

schieben / drücken – push

ziehen – pull

ein Fahrrad schieben – push a bike

die Zentralheizung – central heating

der Heizkörper – radiator

die Fernheizung – district heating

die Kaution – deposit

der Stuck (an der Decke) – stucco, plastering

der Mietvertrag – rental contract

einen Vertrag schließen – sign a contract

kündigen – cancel

in eine Wohnung einziehen – move into an apartment

umziehen – remove

umziehen: Kleidung – change clothes

ausziehen – move out

ausziehen: Kleidung – take off clothes

Keep on learning!

At our last meeting, we talked about the weather and some more words that came up during the meeting.

Das Wetter

Es ist kalt/eisig/warm/heiß – it is cold/freezing/warm/hot

Mir ist kalt/... – I am cold/…

Es ist heiter/wolkig/bedeckt/sonnig– it is bright/cloudy/overcast/sunny

Es ist sehr/zu kalt… – it is very/too cold…

Frühling/Sommer/Herbst/Winter – spring/summer/autumn/winter

Der Wind – wind

windig – windy

Der Sturm – storm

stürmisch – stormy

Der Hagel – hail

Der Schneeregen – sleet

Der Nieselregen – drizzle

Die Eisglätte – there is no such word in English; LEO dictionary gives the phrase “icy conditions”, but that does not seem very satisfactory to me…

Questions that arose during the meeting

Die Nervensäge – nag in German as a verb “nörgeln, meckern”

gewohnt: Früher habe ich in Berlin gewohnt – perfect form of wohnen – live

gewöhnt: Ich bin gewöhnt, früh aufzustehen – be used to

Rasen, Wiese, Weide, Feld, Heide

= lawn, meadow, field, heath

bright in German: not only beautiful weather!

  leuchtend
  strahlend
  aufgeweckt
  blank
  fröhlich
  froh
  gescheit
  glänzend
  heiter
  intelligent
  klar
  klug
  licht
  sehr freundlich

See you next Monday, to practise and discuss more German phrases!

Dear Friends of the German language,

in our first two meetings of conversational German, we learned the following phrases:

Greeting somebody and saying good bye:

Guten Morgen – in the morning

Guten Tag – during the day

Guten Abend – in the evening

Gute Nacht – only for saying good bye at night

Auf Wiedersehen – good bye

Tschüß – colloquial saying good bye

Mahlzeit (= “Gesegnete Mahlzeit”) – at noontime for lunch

Asking a direction:

Fährt dieser Bus zum Zoo? – Does this bus go to the zoo?

Wohin fährt dieser Bus? – Wher does this bus go?

Being late (e.g. for an appointment, a meeting):

Es tut mir leid, dass ich zu spät bin – Sorry for being late

Die S-Bahn war verspätet – the S-Bahn was delayed

Ich habe verschlafen – I overslept

At the station:

Der Bahnsteig – the platform

Das Gleis – the track

Der Zug fährt von Bahnsteig / Gleis 1 – the train leaves from platform 1

Zug in Richtung Leipzig – train for Leipzig

Der Zug ist schon weg – the train has already left

Der Zug kommt noch – the train will arrive

Der Zug ist noch nicht weg – the train has not yet left

=> schon – already

=> noch – still

=> noch nicht – not yet

Eating

essen – for humans

futtern – eat fast and much (colloquial)

fressen – for animals or insulting for humans

füttern – feed

Ich esse gerade Mittag – I am just having lunch

Er futtert ganz schön viel – he eats quite a lot

Die Katze frisst eine Maus – the cat is eating a mouse

Addressing people:

Addressing someone by “du” is informal and only for friends or someone you know well. In some professions, colleages address each other by “du”, like IKEA or the media branch. It is the same as being on first name terms in English.

If you are on the job or you don´t know someone well or not at all, you better use “Sie”, especially if the person is much older than you or in a higher position and you want or have to express esteem. It is the same as being on second name terms in English.

Keep learning and practising German, especially if you live in Germany. Conditions are favourable if you live in a native language environment.

During our last Friends Club meeting, somebody brought this up:

Everybody knows the feeling that after a good round of walking, running or playing football or tennis, there is a funny feeling in your muscles which makes it nearly unable to move.

In German, the word is “Muskelkater”. But there is no use translating it literally, as for “Muskel” the English word is “muscle”, but the German word “Kater” means “tom cat” in English, That does not make any sense. Still, there is another meaning for “Kater” in English: “hangover”! And this gets us nearer to the meaning of “Muskelkater”, as you use “Kater” in German for any state of physical indisposition coming from a reason such as too much alcohol or physical exercise.

So, for the German word “Muskelkater” you would use “sore muscles” or “aching muscles”, as the LEO dictionary tells us. The Google translater only knows “ache”, which is fairly unspecific.

For more of these discussions, why don´t you join us at Berlin Friends Club? You will get a warm welcome and you can sure to spend some joyful, interesting hours each Tuesday.

See you then!


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